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Current Exhibition

Ryogoku

Takumi Saito |  Faint Twinkle

April 6 (Sat), - May 18 (Sat), 2024
Opening Reception for the Artist: April 6 (Sat.) 5-7pm

Open: Tuesday - Saturday 11:00 - 19:00

Closed on Sundays, Mondays, and National holidays

GALLERY MoMo Ryogoku is thrilled to announce the second solo exhibition of Takumi Saito, titled "A Faint Twinkle," which will be held at the gallery from Saturday, April 6th to Saturday, May 18th.

Born in Tokyo in 1996, Takumi Saito graduated from Musashino Art University's Department of Japanese Painting in 2018 and completed the Master of Fine Arts program in the Japanese Painting course at the same university in 2020. Since then, she has held numerous solo and group exhibitions in Tokyo.

Saito's works depict scenes of parks, playgrounds, landscapes glimpsed on the way home from school, solitary girls gazing into the distance within these landscapes, children playing with friends, and images of children seemingly cropped from photographs, all rendered in subtle tones. Through her art, Saito delves into the exploration of self-identity and subjectivity, reflecting deeply on the formation of the ego during childhood and interpersonal relationships. She projects her own experiences onto the figures of young girls while expressing emotions and sentiments that are often invisible but worthy of preservation. The girls in Saito's paintings inhabit a delicate space between innocence and maturity.

As Saito explains, "Many of my works depict moments where one feels a return to oneself amidst the routines of daily life, moments of honesty and liberation from constraints, distancing from societal norms." Her artworks capture fleeting moments of happiness and simple joys found within the mundane. As the exhibition's title suggests, we invite you to explore Saito's pieces, which offer new perspectives by capturing the subtle light that resonates with our inner selves.

 

 

Artist comment

There are times when the landscapes and familiar objects we encounter in our daily lives undergo a transformation in our perception.
Engaging in play often leads us to uncover alternative facets of things we once viewed with negativity, while also revealing the allure of previously overlooked elements.
Such sensations often overlap with childhood experiences, serving as a catalyst for recognizing the easily missed occurrences of our everyday lives.

Takumi Saito, 2024

 

 


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